THE MYTH OF LOVE

Unknown-4

Through our Daily Spiritual Practice we release…

The Myth of Love

In the book, ‘Care of the soul’ Thomas Moore refers to the myth of Tristan and Isolde.  Their tale is one of grand love, suffering and mania.  Thomas introduces the possibility that soul caries all these beautiful qualities and that is our culture that is suppressing our true nature, telling us it must not be love if it has all these dynamics.  Our society considers it a disease or dysfunction to allow our burning desire to show the shadows of our souls within our love.  He goes on to say that it is the actual resistance of our nature that is having us lose our souls, turning us to apathy and self-medication.  People are loosing their souls, while becoming socially reformed.

Plato said, “If we let loose our hold on our philosophies and psychologies of enlightenment and reason, we might learn to appreciate the perspective of eternity that enters life as madness… love is a Divine Frenzy!”

As we awaken, we see how not being authentic has led us to our own dis-empowerment.  We experience the grandeur of love within all of our passion.  We witness how many people walk away from ‘the love of their life’ because it was too painful.  Now, it is time for us to live our truth and live transparent, authentic lives.  We no longer live the implanted thoughts our culture has told us of love and relationships.  We follow our hearts and our truth.  We begin to understand why the divorce rate is so high, due to people trying to live a facade of roles and limited identities.  Living is bliss, pain, happiness, sorrow, ups, downs, ecstasy and torment… all into one glorious thing called life!   We are liberated to ask our soul what expression it desires and live it!

Daily Affirmation:  I am the burning desire to live passionately!

Daily Spiritual Practice:  Today, I will live out loud.  I will release my fears and desire to be socially acceptable, and live boldly.  I will seek to know and experience my soul, in its entirety!

Youtube:  Prelude of Tristan and Isolde

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: